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DVD Video - Title Selection
Gummo

Release Date: 3/20/01
MSRP: $19.95

Studio: New Line

Year: 1997

Run Time: 105 minutes

Rating: R

Starring: Jacob Reynolds, ChloŽ Sevigny, Nick Sutton, Jacob Sewell, Darby Dougherty

Directed by: Harmony Korine

Produced by: Cary Woods

Written by: Harmony Korine

   Movie Summary: [Drama]

    More a poetic collage than a narrative story, GUMMO presents the viewer with a lavish feast of images--some disturbing, some gorgeous, all memorable. In the small, impoverished town of Xenia, Ohio, Solomon (Jacob Reynolds) and Tummler (Nick Sutton) spend their teenage boyhood killing cats, sniffing glue, and generally trying to alleviate their boredom. The townís other residents find their own amusements. Solomonís mother (Linda Manz, of DAYS OF HEAVEN, a film that GUMMOís dreamlike imagery evokes) tap dances, local teen siren Dot (ChloŽ Sevigny) puts tape on her nipples, and Bunny Boy (Jacob Sewell) explores the desolate suburban landscape on his skateboard, wearing pink rabbit ears. Xenia and its inhabitants have never quite recovered from the tornado which ripped the town apart 20 years ago; the place remains inside out, raw, and shattered. GUMMOís gritty realism is enhanced by Korineís use of real locations in and around Nashville, Tennesse, and his use of nonprofessional local actors in many of the filmís roles. These techniques harken back to filmmakers such as Werner Herzog and John Cassavetes, both of whom Korine cites as influences. Korineís willingness to explore the borderlands of feature filmmaking has resulted in a beautiful and challenging film whose haunting images stay with you long after itís over.


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